Can Bad Credit be Deleted From My Credit Report

by Guest Blogger on August 4, 2011

in Credit Reports


Erasing Bad Credit

Yes, it can. Despite the fervent proclamations of bureaucrats and credit bureaus everywhere, a simple fact remains: negative credit listings are deleted from peoples’ credit reports by the thousands each and every day.

A few years ago, an attorney from Lexington Law. visited with a regulatory agency for a casual conversation with two agents. The Agency’s office, as a matter of course, believed the credit bureaus’ claim that bad credit couldn’t be deleted. The visiting Lexington attorney asked, “How many negative listings would you have to see deleted from consumer credit reports before you would believe that bad credit can be deleted: ten? fifty? a hundred? one thousand?” The agents responded with only blank stares.


“How about 50,000 deleted listings, would that convince you?” continued the Lexington attorney. From his briefcase he pulled a stack of papers six inches high.

“In these pages, we have listed the permanent deletion of over 50,000. listings from our clients’ files in the last two years alone,” he explained. The agents pulled the stack across the conference table and began to pick through the pages, taking in the massive list.

“But have you deleted any bankruptcies?” shot back one of the agents, “we know that bankruptcies can’t be deleted.” The Lexington attorney leaned across the table and ran his finger down the first page.

“There’s one deleted bankruptcy… and, there’s another,… and another,… and another. Should I go on?” asked the Lexington attorney.


The agents sat back in their chairs. “You know,” began the junior agent, “I have this one listing on my credit report that simply must belong to somebody else…”

How is credit repair possible?

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) allows a consumer to challenge the information on his credit report on the basis of “completeness and accuracy.” When a consumer files a dispute, the credit bureaus must contact the source of the credit information (the creditor) and confirm that the information is accurate, verifiable, and not obsolete. In some circumstances, the credit bureau is required to go beyond a simple verification of the creditor’s own computer record. If, within 30 days, the credit bureau has not received verification from the creditor, then the credit bureau must promptly delete the credit listing. Learn More.


Related Questions:

  • can bad credit be erased
  • credit agency deletion of obsolete records
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